Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15258
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dc.contributor.authorSimpson, RC-
dc.contributor.authorAlison Pullen-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-12T12:15:45Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-12T12:15:45Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationWork, Employment and Societyen_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-8722-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15258-
dc.description.abstractThis article analyses the meanings tattooists as ‘body workers’ construct around their work. Based on an ethnographic study, the research finds that tattooists adhere to notions of non-conformity, unconventional artistry and professionalism. We locate these meanings within the cultural values and aesthetics of ‘cool’ as an admired set of attributes and displays which enable tattooists to manage some of the tensions of the work. Combining Bourdieu’s concept of habitus with Gagliardi’s notion of landscape, we develop the idea of ‘bodyscape’ to further an integrated understanding of body work as spatialized and embodied i.e. one which incorporates the significance of spatial practices and artefacts, the bodies of those worked upon and the embodied dispositions of workers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectaesthetic labouren_US
dc.subjectbody worken_US
dc.subject‘cool’en_US
dc.subjecttattooing.en_US
dc.title‘Cool’ Meanings: Tattoo Artists, Body Work and Organizational ‘Bodyscape’en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfWork, Employment and Society-
pubs.publication-statusAccepted-
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